Don’t Stop Doing Hard Things

In a world of perfect social media photos and selective life updates, it can be easy to feel alone; especially if you’re doing hard things or going through a painful situation. But, if you read the words of some of the best known missionaries, their life-storytelling is raw and often unpleasant, filled with failures and heartache. And yet, they are remembered as people of joy, hope, and success. How is that possible?

Because of Christ. 

God is serious when He says that His power is made perfect in weakness (2 Corinthians 12:9). Actually, I’m writing these words in tears, because I need to read them as much as you do. Everything about this work with Lupins Africa is hard. Really hard. I feel so insufficient to do this task. And yet, God has called me to do it. I know that. But, it’s still hard. 

You may relate to this. I relate to those missionaries, not because of their strengths but because of their weaknesses. We are drawn to their struggles because we struggle too.  And we begin to believe that God can use the hardest things in our lives to bring the greatest successes.

Our weakness for His glory.

“Therefore do not throw away your confidence, which has a great reward. For you have need of endurance, so that when you have done the will of God you may receive what is promised.” Hebrews 10: 35-36

For the Gospel,

Kristen

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